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Two families hope to ‘stop the clock’ on Muscular Dystrophy

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As the Argyle community gears up for Swing Time, a dinner and dance event benefitting research and education for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy, two families watch the clock tick down on the days that their sons will continue to walk or even breathe on their own.

Michael Hope, an 11 year old at Argyle Intermediate School, and Corbin Fanning, a kindergartner at Hilltop Elementary, are facing different stages of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy, but their families share a common hope that a cure for the disease will be found.

“Lives are stolen by this disease every day,” Michael’s mom, Tricia Hope, said. “People need to be educated about this disease so that more money can be given to research. Without research, there will be no cure. Without a cure, Duchenne will continue to rob young boys of their lives.”

The Hopes and Fannings joined with Argyle United Methodist Church to sponsor Swing Time, where families will dine and dance to the big band sounds of the Argyle High School Jazz Band. The event will be held Sunday, May 23 from 6:30-8:30 pm at Argyle UMC.

All proceeds will benefit Parent Project Muscualr Dystrophy, a group that is leading the front in Duchenne research.

Duchenne, a degenerative disease that results in progressive muscle weakness and loss of strength, eventually leads to serious medical problems with the heart and lungs. Duchenne is the most common fatal genetic disorder diagnosed in early childhood.

“We had no idea,” Corbin’s mom, Amy Fanning, said. “He was never a crazy climb-on-everything kid. He was always calmer, and we thought he was just calm.”

Corbin’s diagnosis came after his four-year checkup, where doctors tested his movement and activity levels, followed by blood work.

“Our whole world was totally changed,” Mrs. Fanning said. “Our dreams for him completely changed. It is still hard to swallow right now because his symptoms are so mild, but as he progresses so will the disease.”

Mrs. Fanning and Corbin’s father, Chris Fanning, sold their two-story house and moved into a one-story to eliminate stairs from their son’s routine. They went from encouraging activity to limiting it, and changed their outlook for their family’s future.

For more information about the event, call 940-464-1333 ext. 105.

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